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Changing a Child Custody Plan Through Modification

It is important for Florida families to understand the changes that they will face when the parents go through separations and divorces. When a relationship between parents ends, the adults must learn to live their lives separately and their children must learn how to exist without having both of their parents in their home. A good child custody plan can ease tensions and concerns over how children will receive the love and support they need after a divorce.

However, child custody plans can become obsolete if the lives of the affected children and parents go through further adaptations. When this occurs, it is possible to seek modifications to existing child custody agreements or orders. Before attempting to change a child custody arrangement, a parent can choose to talk to their trusted divorce or family law attorney.

Why Might a Custody Plan Need to Change?

Child custody plans can change for many reasons. Sometimes parents move away and cannot be as available to their kids as they were when their custody schedules were established. Sometimes children require new or different accommodations that only one of their parents can provide. Whatever the reason, a child custody plan may need to be modified to continue to serve the best interests of the child or children.

How Can a Parent Change a Custody Plan?

Getting a child custody arrangement modified can take work and negotiations with a co-parent. In some cases, a co-parent may fight proposed changes and court intervention may be needed. It is important that parents understand the importance of having their custody modifications officially recognized so that they can continue to seek enforcement of them if their co-parents do not abide by the agreed to terms.

When Should a Custody Modification be Sought?

Parents should not wait to seek child custody modifications as the process of making changes can take time. When they become aware of an issue that may impact their parental rights and parenting responsibilities, they can contact their family law attorneys for advice and support. Readers are reminded that this post does not offer any legal counsel.

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